Austin Personal Training Redefined

Wall Facing Handstand Hold

Wall Facing Handstand Hold

Execution: The client will start with their feet facing the wall in a push up position. From here they will begin climbing their feet up the wall, while using their hands to push their feet higher until they are inverted. It is important to note that the client should stay in a hollow position while climbing up into the handstand to keep stress away from their lumbar spine. Once inverted the client should maintain a hollow position with the toes pointed up, quads flexed, glutes tight, ribcage down, while actively pushing up through the shoulders, and keeping a neutral spine. The only parts of the body that should be touching the wall should be the nose and toes. Notes: It is very important that the athlete has the sufficient scapular stability and mobility through the thoracic spine, latissimus dorsi muscles, and both the anterior and posterior deltoids in order to do this movement correctly.  This may also be written as Chest-to-wall static handstand holds. Purpose: The purpose of the wall-facing handstand hold is for the client to get comfortable while in an inverted position, focusing on balancing themselves while keeping good posture. Facing the wall allows the body to be closer to the wall so the athlete keeps their body in a stacked position. Being so close to the wall also makes balancing more difficult so the athlete should use their entire hand to balance (gripping the floor). This movement is great for building shoulder/scapular stability, shoulder endurance, and midline stability in a static inverted position. Programing: When incorporating the wall-facing handstand into a program, it is important to make the length of time holding this position appropriate to the athlete’s strength. Losing a neutral spine and holding this position for extended periods of time will not give the proper stimulus intended for the client and can lead to injuries down the road. It can be used as part of a handstand progression, a warm up, or even a cool down. Variations: Other variations include, back-facing handstand hold, pike position box facing handstand, overhead weighted holds, and any of the many handstand drills posted on the Central Athlete YouTube Channel.

*RESULTS MAY VARY - NOT ALL TESTIMONIALS ARE COMMON



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